Virtual Concert

Virtual Concert

Walker | Beethoven

Learn more about the Program

Diana Cohen Concertmaster, Violin
Lorna Tsai Principal Second Violin
Craig Hutchenreuther Second Violin
Laurent Grillet-Kim Principal Viola
Arthur Bachmann Viola
Kathleen de Caen Cello
Thomas Megee Cello
Jonathan Yeoh Bass
Slavko Popovic Principal Clarinet
Antoine St.-Onge Principal Bassoon
Heather Wootton Assistant Principal Horn

Lorna Tsai, Craig Hutchenreuther, Arthur Bachmann, Thomas Megee
George Walker Molto Adagio (Lyric for Strings) from String Quartet No. 1
Diana Cohen, Laurent Grillet-Kim, Kathleen de Caen, Jonathan Yeoh, Slavko Popovic, Antoine St.-Onge , Heather Wooton
Ludwig van Beethoven Septet in E-flat Major, Op. 20
I. Adagio — Allegro con brio
II. Adagio cantabile
III. Tempo di menuetto
IV. Tema con variazioni: Andante
V. Scherzo: Allegro molto e vivace
VI. Andante con moto alla Marcia — Presto

Learn more about the Program

Diana Cohen Concertmaster, Violin
Lorna Tsai Principal Second Violin
Craig Hutchenreuther Second Violin
Laurent Grillet-Kim Principal Viola
Arthur Bachmann Viola
Kathleen de Caen Cello
Thomas Megee Cello
Jonathan Yeoh Bass
Slavko Popovic Principal Clarinet
Antoine St.-Onge Principal Bassoon
Heather Wootton Assistant Principal Horn

Lorna Tsai, Craig Hutchenreuther, Arthur Bachmann, Thomas Megee
George Walker Molto Adagio (Lyric for Strings) from String Quartet No. 1
Diana Cohen, Laurent Grillet-Kim, Kathleen de Caen, Jonathan Yeoh, Slavko Popovic, Antoine St.-Onge , Heather Wooton
Ludwig van Beethoven Septet in E-flat Major, Op. 20
I. Adagio — Allegro con brio
II. Adagio cantabile
III. Tempo di menuetto
IV. Tema con variazioni: Andante
V. Scherzo: Allegro molto e vivace
VI. Andante con moto alla Marcia — Presto

Artist Bios

Praised for her “incredible flair, maturity and insight,” violinist Diana Cohen leads a multi-faceted career as a concertmaster, chamber musician, soloist, and arts administrator.  Appointed concertmaster of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra in 2012, she previously served as concertmaster of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra and Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra while maintaining an active freelance career in New York City. She has held the same position with Charleston Symphony (with which she performed numerous works as soloist), The National Repertory Orchestra, Iris Orchestra and Red {an orchestra}, and has been guest concertmaster with the Rochester Philharmonic and the Phoenix Symphony.

Cohen has performed regularly in concerts in New York and across the globe with the Grammy-winning Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, The International Sejong Soloists, The Knights, and as a substitute at the New York Philharmonic and The Cleveland Orchestra. She has also appeared as a soloist with the Rochester Philharmonic, National Repertory Orchestra, Kalamazoo Symphony, Valdosta Symphony, Hilton Head Symphony and Red {an orchestra}. She was concertmaster of the Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra, principal second of the New York String Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, and has been rotating principal of the Iris Orchestra since its inception. Cohen’s solo recital on the Dame Myra Hess Series was heard live on Chicago public radio.

As a founding member of the piano trio Trio Terzetto, Cohen has toured and recorded in cities across the United States and Canada. Trio Terzetto has been presented on chamber music series in cities including New York, Cleveland, Ann Arbor, Memphis, Charleston, Lansing, Detroit, Augusta, Charlotte, South Bend, and Asheville. They recently made their solo debut with the Lansing Symphony, performing Beethoven’s “Triple Concerto.” Trio Terzetto is committed to outreach, and often organizes these projects around their performances

A passionate chamber musician, Cohen has performed at the Marlboro Music Festival, The Steans Institute at the Ravinia Festival, The Chamber Music Festival of Giverny, France, The Perlman Chamber Music Program, Aspen and Piccolo Spoleto as well as festivals in Maui, Dresden, Bennington, Saugatuck, Martha’s Vineyard and Gretna. She has also been a participant in The American String Project. Cohen has appeared in chamber concerts with members of the Cleveland Orchestra at Severance Hall and has performed on faculty concerts at the Cleveland Institute of Music.  ohen has regularly collaborated with members of the Guarneri, Juilliard, Cleveland, Miro and Parker Quartets, as well as with renowned artists including Mitsuko Uchida, Kim Kashkashian, Garrick Ohlsson and many others. She has also played regularly with her family; Cleveland Orchestra principal clarinetist Franklin Cohen, Alexander Cohen, principal timpanist of the Calgary Philharmonic, and her late mother, bassoonist Lynette Diers Cohen. Works have been commissioned for the Cohen family quartet. Cohen and her father released a CD of Osvoldo Golijov’s “Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind” for clarinet and string quartet.

Cohen is Executive and Co-Artistic Director of ChamberFest Cleveland (chamberfestcleveland.com), which features the world’s most sought-after chamber musicians, and has partnered with several of the most esteemed organizations in Cleveland.

Cohen is an honors graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music where she was the recipient of the 2000 Jerome Gross Prize in violin and a winner of the Darius Milhaud competition. Her principal teachers were Donald Weilerstein, William Preucil and Paul Kantor and Joel Smirnoff.

Her solo and chamber performances have been heard on radio stations across the country. Many of her performances from the Marlboro Music Festival have been broadcast on New York’s WQXR. She can also be heard on recordings with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra.

In addition to her performance career, Cohen is a devoted teacher. Many of her students have won national awards. She has worked extensively in public schools and has served on the preparatory chamber music faculty of the Cleveland Institute of Music.

Diana Cohen has a multifaceted career as a concertmaster, chamber musician and soloist. She is Concertmaster of the Calgary Philharmonic, and founder and Artistic Director of acclaimed music festival ChamberFest Cleveland. As soloist, she has appeared with numerous orchestras, including Holland Symphony, Rochester Symphony, Lansing, and Grand Rapids, among others. As a chamber musician, she has performed at some of the most prestigious festivals including Marlboro Music Festival and Ravinia Festival, and collaborated with renowned artists including Garrick Ohlsson, Mitsuko Uchida, Jonathan Biss, and members of the Guarneri, Juilliard, Miro, Cleveland, and Parker Quartets.

Cohen has toured and recorded with the Grammy-winning Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, and performed with the East Coast Chamber Orchestra, Sejong Soloists, The Knights, Cleveland Orchestra, and New York Philharmonic.

Cohen lives in Calgary with her husband and baby, Noa Lynette, who loves being danced to music. As a result of the pandemic, Cohen and her husband created a lauded concert series in their front yard, Garden Concerts YYC, performing weekly concerts to hundreds of music lovers from around Calgary. To be added to their mailing list, email [email protected].

A native of Massachusetts, Lorna Tsai began her studies at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School in Boston at the age of five. Tsai has received recognition for her work, among them from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, the New England String Ensemble, the Concord Symphony, and the New England Conservatory Preparatory School. Upon receiving her bachelor degree in violin performance from Northwestern University, she continued her studies at Yale University School of Music, where she earned her masters in violin performance. Previous teachers include Magdalena Richter, Marylou Speaker Churchill, Roland and Almita Vamos, and Ani Kavafian.

Tsai is currently the Principal Second Violinist of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra, serving in the position since Fall of 2011. Prior to joining the Calgary Phil, she performed with ensembles such as the New World Symphony and Louisville Orchestra. Tsai has also performed as soloist with various orchestras including the New England String Ensemble, the Concord Symphony, Symphony Pro Musica, and the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra.

During the summers, Tsai participates in music festivals, which in the past have included the Verbier Festival Chamber Orchestra, Verbier Festival Orchestra, Artosphere Music Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, Tanglewood Music Center, Pacific Music Festival, and Aspen Music Festival. She is a co-founder and co-director of Manchester Summer Chamber Music, a chamber music series dedicated to presenting classical concerts to Cape Ann, north of Boston.

Craig Hutchenreuther is a native of Detroit, and earned his bachelor of music degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music. He has played in the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra since 1977, and was concertmaster of the Calgary Civic Symphony for over 20 years. Hutchenreuther is also active as a chamber musician, with the Zabaglione String Quartet. He arranges and composes music for small ensembles, and has had his work published by Alberta Keys Music Publishing.

Who do you think are or were the masters of your instrument?
Too many to mention! I am a fan of Nicola Benedetti both for her playing and her commitment to music education.

Tell us a little about your instrument.
My violin was built in 1983 by Ann Arbor luthier David Burgess. I am very proud of the fact that after I put my deposit down on this instrument he took it overseas to a violin makers’ competition in Germany where it won a gold medal.

Do you play in any groups/ensembles outside of the orchestra?
I am the second violinist of the mighty Zabaglione String Quartet. One can also find me playing fiddle in the garage band across the street from my house, the name of which changes every week.

What kinds of music do you listen to when you’re ‘off-duty’? What’s currently on your iPod?
I listen more to talk radio than to music, either sports or current events. When I do listen to music it can be anything from classical to classic rock to R&B.

How do you prepare for a concert? Any pre-game rituals?
Nap, supper, shower, get dressed, go play!

How old were you when you started playing?
Eight years old.

Laurent Grillet-Kim was born in Bordeaux, France where he started playing the violin at the age of eight. After graduating from the Bordeaux conservatory he went on to study in Lyon and Boulogne-Billancourt for a short time, then returned to his native city and took private lessons with Prof. Micheline Lefebvre (violin) and Prof. Pierre Lefebvre (viola).

Before moving to the United States to study viola with Prof. Arad and Prof. DeVeritch, and violin with Prof. Agostini, Grillet-Kim worked on cruise ships and traveled around the world for 10 months.

While at Indiana University, he had the opportunity to play chamber music with the faculty members of the music school and was principal viola of the Indiana University Philharmonic Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra. He also was part of the Kuttner Quartet, the student resident quartet. Grillet-Kim was regularly invited to play with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra during his last year of studies.

In 1984 Arthur Bachmann graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a bachelor of music in viola performance. In 1986 he won a job as a violist in the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra — a position he holds to this day.

In 1990, Bachmann began a new career as a composer and arranger, and then became an Associate Composer of the Canadian Music Centre in 1997. His music has been heard on CBC Radio, recorded and performed across Canada, the United States and Europe. In September 2012, Bachmann premiered a new chamber opera, What Brought Us Here, commissioned and presented by Calgary Opera, and in September 2015, he premiered another chamber opera, Annie Davidson, commissioned and presented by Cowtown Opera, Calgary. The year 2016 brought forth a large scale flute concerto commissioned and presented by the Calgary Philharmonic with Principle Flautist Sara Hahn as soloist.

Bachmann’s compositions reflect his long-standing association and deep connection to the Alberta landscapes surrounding Calgary. A strong element of his music is melody as well as the incorporation of a sense of tonality. He makes use of all styles and forms of contemporary classical idioms to create his music and to bridge the gap between composer, performer and audience.

Kathleen de CaenGrowing up in Edmonton, Kathleen de Caen started playing the cello at age five. Her primary teachers were Grazyna Sobieraj, Julie Amundsen, and Tanya Prochazka, with whom she completed a bachelor’s degree at the University of Alberta. She later went on to complete a master’s degree in cello performance with Matt Haimovitz at McGill University.

As a soloist, de Caen has been invited to perform with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra on multiple occasions for their education series. She was also the featured young artist of the ESO’s 2012 Symphony Under the Sky series.

As a chamber musician, de Caen has performed across North America with musicians such as Yehonatan Berick, Jean Efflam-Bavouzet, and Paul Coletti. She has participated numerous times with Matt Haimovitz’s ensemble, Uccello, which performed at Carnegie Hall in 2013. In 2016, she co-founded Trio De Moda, an Alberta-based string trio that has performed across Alberta and the Maritime provinces.

Following a season as acting principal cello of Symphony Nova Scotia in Halifax during 2017/2018, de Caen was very excited to return to Alberta and join the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra as a section cellist.

Thomas Megee is currently a member of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra and Zabaglione String Quartet in addition to being a private instructor of the cello. He also retains his position with the Oregon Coast Music Festival each summer as Principal Cellist and featured chamber artist.

Born in Indiana, Megee graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy and received a bachelor of music performance degree from the University of Michigan where he studied with Oliver Edel and Samuel Mayes. His further studies include postgraduate work with Frank Miller in Chicago and a year with Andre Navarra at both the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy, and the Hochschule Fur Musik und Darst Kunst in Vienna.

Before joining the Calgary Phil in 1990, Megee was an instructor at Oregon State University, Principal Cellist of the Portland Opera Orchestra, and a founding member of the Metolius Quartet. He has been a featured soloist with numerous orchestras in the United States and Canada and can often be heard on CBC Radio in chamber performances as well as with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra.

Jonathan Yeoh, born and raised in Calgary, Alberta, is the newest member of the double bass section with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra, and is also the Assistant Principal Double Bass of the National Ballet of Canada Orchestra. He has performed with the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and Canadian Opera Company, while also being a previous fellow at the Music Academy of the West, winning the London Symphony Keston MAX Award in 2019.

He is currently finishing his master’s degree at Boston University with Edwin Barker, and holds a bachelor of music with distinction in Performance from the University of Calgary with Charles Garrett, previous Principal Bass of the Calgary Phil. Yeoh has also worked closely with David Allen Moore, Paul Ellison, François Rabbath, Ali Yazdanfar, and Theodore Chan. When not playing the double bass, Yeoh is a voracious eater, and can often be found exercising and powerlifting to justify that habit.

Slavko Popovic HeadshotSlavko Popovic joined the Calgary Philharmonic as their Principal Clarinetist in June 2018 at the age of 22.

Popovic is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music. While at Curtis, he had participated on two tours – a woodwind quintet tour of the United States and South America, and an orchestra tour of Europe. At Curtis he studied with Donald Montanaro, Ricardo Morales, Michael Rusinek, and Anthony McGill. He has performed with Michael Rusinek, Daniel Matuskawa (Bassoon), Jennifer Montone (Horn), Peter Serkin, Jennifer Koh, and Roberto Diaz, to name a few. Prior to entering Curtis, Popovic studied with Joseph Orlowski, Stephen Pierre, and Ross Edwards – with additional study with Kimball Sykes and Joaquin Valdepeñas.

He has performed as an extra clarinetist with the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, Princeton Symphony, Harrisburg Symphony, and Orchestra 2001. He has toured with both the National Youth Orchestra of Canada, and the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra – the latter of which he was featured as soloist in Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No 1. Popovic has also performed as soloist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra playing Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto, Oakville Symphony, Symphony Hamilton, and the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.

Popovic has attended music festivals such as the AIMS festival in Graz, Austria, National Orchestra Institute, International Music Academy in Mezzano, Italy, Manchester Music Festival, and for last four years has been part of the Lake George Festival in Lake George, NY. His Lake George performance of the Brahms Clarinet Trio was broadcast on “Performance Today” with Fred Child as the host. His various other chamber music performances have been broadcast on “WHYY” in Philadelphia.

When he isn’t practicing or performing, Popovic enjoys spending time with friends and family, and keeping fit by going on long bike rides, and swimming.

Antoine St-Onge joined the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra as Principal Bassoonist in June 2018 at the age of 23.

A native of Morin-Heights, Québec, he earned his Bachelor’s in Music from the Montreal Music Conservatory and then graduated from McGill University, under the guidance of Montreal Symphony Orchestra members Mathieu Harel and Stéphane Lévesque. He also spent a semester studying with Carlo Colombo at the CNSMDP in Lyon, France. Before his appointment to the Calgary Phil, St-Onge performed with the Montreal Contemporary Ensemble (ECM+), and was a substitute for the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Drummondville Symphony Orchestra, l’Orchestre des Pays de Savoie, and Les Violons du Roy.

St-Onge was featured as a soloist with the Montreal Music Conservatory and with the McGill Symphony Orchestra, in G. Rossini’s and André Jolivet’s bassoon concerto.

St-Onge has an unconditional love for animals, and the outdoors — especially biking and snowboarding. He plays on a Benson Bell bassoon made in Ontario, Canada.

Heather Wootton has been a member of the horn section of the Calgary Philharmonic since 1993.

Before coming to Calgary, she was a member the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra, the Stratford Festival Orchestra, and maintained an active and varied freelance career about southern Ontario.

Born in Provost, Alberta and raised largely in Ottawa, Ontario, Wootton received a bachelor of musical arts and an artists’ diploma in performance from the University of Western Ontario, and continued her studies with the Orchestral Training Program of the Royal Conservatory and the National Youth Orchestra of Canada. Her main teachers at that time included Robert Creech and Eugene Rittich.

Further studies included summers at the Keystone Brass Institute in Colorado, the Kent/Blossom Festival in Ohio, and the Festival Orchestra of the American Institute of Musical Studies in Graz, Austria.  Wootton enjoyed studying with such artists as Richard Solis, Gail Williams, Bill Klingelhoffer, and Phillip Farkas.

From 2001 to 2008, she was guest soloist and horn instructor at the Summer Music on the Shannon music festival then based in Limerick, Ireland.

Wootton is an avid chamber musician and was a founding member of the chamber ensembles Rosa Selvatica, and Altius Brass. She loves to teach, is a sought after clinician, and finds great joy in helping students of all ages discover music and the horn.

In January of 2016, Wootton helped launch the Calgary Philharmonic’s Sistema-inspired PhilKids after-school music program. In the role of Lead Teaching Artist, she continues to lead a team helping children, who wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity, learn to play an instrument and explore all the benefits that music can add to our lives.

She is Mum to Liam, a busy teenager, and enjoys being involved in her close-knit community of Wildwood, gardening, walking the family’s two border collies, and spending time at the family cottage in Ontario, her “little piece of heaven.”

Virtual Concert FAQ

Our virtual concerts are free to watch, but first you have to register at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts.

You can view the concert on any device, including smartphone, tablet, laptop, desktop computer, or a television connected to the internet. Ensure your device is fully charged, powered on or plugged-in, and double check your sound is on.

Just before the performance begins, and using your selected viewing device:

  1. Open the PDF e-tickets attached to your email.
  2. Click the link on your PDF, or enter the URL in the search/address bar or of your internet browser. The concert viewing page will open.
  3. Copy or type your Unique Access Code (the code is case sensitive) into the password box and press play.
  4. Each performance will start at 7:30PM on the date of the premiere. Enjoy the music!

The video will be available starting at 7:30PM on the day of the concert premiere, and then will remain available for 30 days. If your video doesn’t start right at 7:30PM, you may need to refresh your web browser or click the link again — don’t worry, the concert will start from the beginning when you hit play, so even if you’re late, you won’t miss anything.

For the optimal listening experience, we recommend listening through high-quality headphones or stream through your home stereo. Our video was captured in High Definition (1080p) and will look great on any screen you choose — to watch the concert in full-screen mode, click the four arrows in the bottom right-hand corner of the video to maximize your screen.

Here are some articles we think you might find helpful for setup:

These concerts are about 60 minutes, although each performance will be different.

Don’t worry! The video will be available for 30 days starting at 7:30PM on the day of the concert premiere. You can watch the performance as many times as you’d like using your concert link and access code. After 30 days, the video will no longer be available.

Yes, you can register at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts anytime within 30 days of the concert premiere.

It’s easy! You can register online at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts. First, choose the concert you want to watch and follow the prompts. You can continue to select other upcoming concerts, one at a time, by clicking the titles in the basket. Then click the Checkout button and enter your email.

If you have an account with us, you’ll be asked for your password (if you can’t remember it, just click Forgotten Password? and we’ll email you a link to reset it). If you don’t have an existing account, you can provide your name and a password to create one.

At this stage, you can choose to set a password, or continue without setting a password. Once you’ve confirmed your order, check your email. You should receive an order confirmation followed by an email with your e-tickets attached as a PDF. Your e-ticket has the link and the Unique Access Code you’ll need to watch the concert.

If you have any problems registering, please contact us at [email protected] and we’re happy to help. We’re also available by phone on weekdays from 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM at 403.571.0849.

If you’re watching together on one device, you only need to register one person.

Yes, if you prefer to register by phone, you can call our Box Office at 403.571.0849 (Monday to Friday 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM) and our sales team will be happy to help you. You’ll need to provide an email address so they can send you an e-ticket, which will include the link for the concert and the Unique Access Code you need to watch it.

You do need to register for each concert you want to watch because every concert will have its own concert link and Unique Access Code.

Yes, absolutely! You can register for as many virtual concerts as you want. During the registration process, once you’ve selected the number of tickets you want for an individual concert, a list of the other available concerts will be visible — simply click the title of the next concert you want to watch, then repeat the process until they’re all in your basket. You will receive a separate e-ticket with a different link and Unique Access Code for each concert. Keep in mind that the performances will be available for 30 days starting at the listed date and time of the premiere.

Check your email junk and/or spam folder. If it’s not there, login to your account at calgaryphil.com/account. Under Details, click the e-tickets link and from there you can download the ticket for the concert link and Unique Access Code.

If you’re still having problems, contact us at [email protected] and we’re happy to help. We’re also available by phone on weekdays from 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM at 403.571.0849.

These concerts are part of our new fall series running from October to December 2020 and were specifically created to provide an online viewing experience during this period when we aren’t able to have a live audience in our concert hall. The performances will premiere online, and then they will be available to view on our website for 30 days. The concerts on our All Access page are from our archive of live-stream recordings in previous seasons.

For the health and safety of our musicians, staff, and the public, we are carefully following the COVID-19 guidelines set out by Alberta Health Services. At this time indoor gatherings of more than 50 people are not allowed, and provincial and municipal protocols require everyone to physically distance and wear masks. We have 66 full-time musicians in our Orchestra, and live concerts also involve several people behind the scenes to monitor the sound, move equipment, assist the artists, etc. As a result, it is not feasible to invite a live audience into the concert hall at this time.

Although you only see our musicians onscreen during the performance, we also have a small production crew and a few camera operators who help make sure the concert and the video recording process runs smoothly. Everybody wears masks to help protect each other and to comply with city bylaws. In future concerts involving wind and brass instruments, some musicians will remove their masks when it’s time to play.

More Virtual Concerts

[cpo_event_slider display=”list” eventlist=”ticheli-nielsen-mendelssohn,bohme-tchaikovsky,holiday-favourites-with-the-calgary-phil” max=”10″ class=”align-center” id=”” /]