Virtual Concert

Virtual Concert

Ticheli | Nielsen | Mendelssohn

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Ticheli | Nielsen | Mendelssohn

Program: In C Dorian (Canadian Premiere), by Frank Ticheli; Serenato in vano, by Nielsen; Octet in E-flat Major, by Mendelssohn.

Musicians: Violins — John Lowry (Associate Concertmaster), Olga Kotova, Hyewon Grillet-Kim, Theresa Lane; Violas — Peter Blake, Arthur Bachmann; Cellos — David Morrissey, Daniel Poceta, Karen Youngquist; Basses — Matthew Heller; Clarinets — Slavko Popovic (Principal); Bassoons — Michael Hope (Assistant Principal); Horns — Jennifer Frank-Umana (Associate Principal).

Learn more about the Program

John Lowry Associate Concertmaster, Violin
Olga Kotova First Violin
Hyewon Grillet-Kim Second Violin
Theresa Lane Second Violin
Peter Blake Viola
Arthur Bachmann Viola
David Morrissey Cello
Daniel Poceta Cello
Karen Youngquist Cello
Matthew Heller Bass
Slavko Popovic Principal Clarinet
Michael Hope Assistant Principal Bassoon
Jennifer Frank-Umana Assistant Principal Horn

David Morrissey, Matthew Heller, Slavko Popovic, Michael Hope, Jennifer Frank-Umana
Ticheli In C Dorian (Canadian Premiere)
Nielsen Serenata in vano, CNW 69
I. Allegro non troppo ma brioso
II. Un poco adagio
III. Tempo di marcia
John Lowry, Olga Kotova, Hyewon Grill-Kim, Theresa Lane, Peter Blake, Arthur Bachmann, Daniel Poceta, Karen Youngquist
Mendelssohn Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20
I. Allegro moderato con fuoco
II. Andante
III. Scherzo. Allegro leggierissimo
IV. Presto

Composed in the wake of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, this piece sprang from a need to create music for musicians during a time when full ensembles could not meet altogether in a closed space—a piece that could be played by any combination of instruments and in any number. An important catalyst for my piece is the 1960’s musical movement known as Indeterminacy, and in particular, Terry Riley’s groundbreaking work, In C. Marked by great flexibility in terms of duration, dynamics, instrumentation, and many other parameters, In C serves as a wonderful source of inspiration for anyone seeking pathways to create adaptable music. It is to Mr. Riley that I have dedicated the present piece.

Performance Notes

  • The piece is intended for any combination of instruments of any size ensemble from 3 players to as many as a performance space can accommodate.
  • The dynamic level begins softly and gradually builds in volume over the entire course of the piece, culminating in a joyous climax. Players should pace this process so that the growth is barely noticeable over time.
  • After completing the desired number of repeats of a given line, a player may continue on to the next line without a pause, or the player may rest for one or two bars (or more) before proceeding to the next line.
  • A player may choose to skip a line every now and then, to play lines out of order, or to skip lines entirely, at their discretion.
  • The piece may be played with or without a conductor; in the latter case, a woodblock or found percussion instrument could be played in a metronomic way to help players maintain the constant 4/4 pulse.
  • The piece could end soon after the first player reaches the final line, or it could go on until everyone reaches the final line, or somewhere in between. The conductor (or a selected player), upon making this determination, should provide a definitive cut-off so that all the players end dramatically on beat 4 of the pulse.
  • In the end, this piece is a vehicle for performers to make creative decisions within the overall structural format provided. With that in mind, it is possible that ideas for approaching this piece may extend beyond what is suggested above.

Frank Ticheli’s music has been described as being “optimistic and thoughtful” (Los Angeles Times), “lean and muscular” (New York Times), “brilliantly effective” (Miami Herald) and “powerful, deeply felt crafted with impressive flair and an ear for striking instrumental colours” (South Florida Sun-Sentinel). Ticheli joined the faculty of the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music in 1991, where he is Professor of Composition. From 1991 to 1998, he was Composer in Residence of the Pacific Symphony.

Ticheli’s orchestral works have received considerable recognition in the U.S. and Europe. Orchestral performances have come from the Philadelphia Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Dallas Symphony, American Composers Orchestra, the radio orchestras of Stuttgart, Frankfurt, Saarbruecken, and Austria, and the orchestras of Austin, Bridgeport, Charlotte, Colorado, Haddonfield, Harrisburg, Hong Kong, Jacksonville, Lansing, Long Island, Louisville, Lubbock, Memphis, Nashville, Omaha, Phoenix, Portland, Richmond, San Antonio, San Jose, Wichita Falls, and others. His clarinet concerto was recently recorded by the Nashville Symphony on the Naxos label with soloist James Zimmermann.

Ticheli is well known for his works for concert band, many of which have become standards in the repertoire. In addition to composing, he has appeared as guest conductor of his music at Carnegie Hall, at many American universities and music festivals, and in cities throughout the world, including Schladming (Austria), Beijing and Shanghai, London and Manchester, Singapore, Rome, Sydney, and numerous cities in Japan.

Ticheli is the recipient of a 2012 “Arts and Letters Award” from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, his third award from that prestigious organization. His Symphony No. 2 was named winner of the 2006 NBA/William D. Revelli Memorial Band Composition Contest. Other awards include the Walter Beeler Memorial Prize and First Prize awards in the Texas Sesquicentennial Orchestral Composition Competition, Britten-on-the-Bay Choral Composition Contest, and Virginia CBDNA Symposium for New Band Music.

In 2018, Ticheli received the University of Michigan Alumni Society’s highest honour, the Hall of Fame Award, in recognition for his career as a composer. He was also awarded national honorary membership to Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, “bestowed to individuals who have significantly contributed to the cause of music in America,” and the A. Austin Harding Award by the American School Band Directors Association, “given to individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the school band movement in America.” At USC, he has received the Virginia Ramo Award for excellence in teaching, and the Dean’s Award for Professional Achievement.

Ticheli received his doctoral and masters degrees in composition from The University of Michigan. His works are published by Manhattan Beach, Southern, Hinshaw, and Encore Music, and are recorded on the labels of Albany, Chandos, Clarion, Equilibrium, Klavier, Koch International, Mark, Naxos, and Reference.

Learn more about the Program

John Lowry Associate Concertmaster, Violin
Olga Kotova First Violin
Hyewon Grillet-Kim Second Violin
Theresa Lane Second Violin
Peter Blake Viola
Arthur Bachmann Viola
David Morrissey Cello
Daniel Poceta Cello
Karen Youngquist Cello
Matthew Heller Bass
Slavko Popovic Principal Clarinet
Michael Hope Assistant Principal Bassoon
Jennifer Frank-Umana Assistant Principal Horn

David Morrissey, Matthew Heller, Slavko Popovic, Michael Hope, Jennifer Frank-Umana
Ticheli In C Dorian (Canadian Premiere)
Nielsen Serenata in vano, CNW 69
I. Allegro non troppo ma brioso
II. Un poco adagio
III. Tempo di marcia
John Lowry, Olga Kotova, Hyewon Grill-Kim, Theresa Lane, Peter Blake, Arthur Bachmann, Daniel Poceta, Karen Youngquist
Mendelssohn Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20
I. Allegro moderato con fuoco
II. Andante
III. Scherzo. Allegro leggierissimo
IV. Presto

Composed in the wake of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, this piece sprang from a need to create music for musicians during a time when full ensembles could not meet altogether in a closed space—a piece that could be played by any combination of instruments and in any number. An important catalyst for my piece is the 1960’s musical movement known as Indeterminacy, and in particular, Terry Riley’s groundbreaking work, In C. Marked by great flexibility in terms of duration, dynamics, instrumentation, and many other parameters, In C serves as a wonderful source of inspiration for anyone seeking pathways to create adaptable music. It is to Mr. Riley that I have dedicated the present piece.

Performance Notes

  • The piece is intended for any combination of instruments of any size ensemble from 3 players to as many as a performance space can accommodate.
  • The dynamic level begins softly and gradually builds in volume over the entire course of the piece, culminating in a joyous climax. Players should pace this process so that the growth is barely noticeable over time.
  • After completing the desired number of repeats of a given line, a player may continue on to the next line without a pause, or the player may rest for one or two bars (or more) before proceeding to the next line.
  • A player may choose to skip a line every now and then, to play lines out of order, or to skip lines entirely, at their discretion.
  • The piece may be played with or without a conductor; in the latter case, a woodblock or found percussion instrument could be played in a metronomic way to help players maintain the constant 4/4 pulse.
  • The piece could end soon after the first player reaches the final line, or it could go on until everyone reaches the final line, or somewhere in between. The conductor (or a selected player), upon making this determination, should provide a definitive cut-off so that all the players end dramatically on beat 4 of the pulse.
  • In the end, this piece is a vehicle for performers to make creative decisions within the overall structural format provided. With that in mind, it is possible that ideas for approaching this piece may extend beyond what is suggested above.

Frank Ticheli’s music has been described as being “optimistic and thoughtful” (Los Angeles Times), “lean and muscular” (New York Times), “brilliantly effective” (Miami Herald) and “powerful, deeply felt crafted with impressive flair and an ear for striking instrumental colours” (South Florida Sun-Sentinel). Ticheli joined the faculty of the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music in 1991, where he is Professor of Composition. From 1991 to 1998, he was Composer in Residence of the Pacific Symphony.

Ticheli’s orchestral works have received considerable recognition in the U.S. and Europe. Orchestral performances have come from the Philadelphia Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Dallas Symphony, American Composers Orchestra, the radio orchestras of Stuttgart, Frankfurt, Saarbruecken, and Austria, and the orchestras of Austin, Bridgeport, Charlotte, Colorado, Haddonfield, Harrisburg, Hong Kong, Jacksonville, Lansing, Long Island, Louisville, Lubbock, Memphis, Nashville, Omaha, Phoenix, Portland, Richmond, San Antonio, San Jose, Wichita Falls, and others. His clarinet concerto was recently recorded by the Nashville Symphony on the Naxos label with soloist James Zimmermann.

Ticheli is well known for his works for concert band, many of which have become standards in the repertoire. In addition to composing, he has appeared as guest conductor of his music at Carnegie Hall, at many American universities and music festivals, and in cities throughout the world, including Schladming (Austria), Beijing and Shanghai, London and Manchester, Singapore, Rome, Sydney, and numerous cities in Japan.

Ticheli is the recipient of a 2012 “Arts and Letters Award” from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, his third award from that prestigious organization. His Symphony No. 2 was named winner of the 2006 NBA/William D. Revelli Memorial Band Composition Contest. Other awards include the Walter Beeler Memorial Prize and First Prize awards in the Texas Sesquicentennial Orchestral Composition Competition, Britten-on-the-Bay Choral Composition Contest, and Virginia CBDNA Symposium for New Band Music.

In 2018, Ticheli received the University of Michigan Alumni Society’s highest honour, the Hall of Fame Award, in recognition for his career as a composer. He was also awarded national honorary membership to Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, “bestowed to individuals who have significantly contributed to the cause of music in America,” and the A. Austin Harding Award by the American School Band Directors Association, “given to individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the school band movement in America.” At USC, he has received the Virginia Ramo Award for excellence in teaching, and the Dean’s Award for Professional Achievement.

Ticheli received his doctoral and masters degrees in composition from The University of Michigan. His works are published by Manhattan Beach, Southern, Hinshaw, and Encore Music, and are recorded on the labels of Albany, Chandos, Clarion, Equilibrium, Klavier, Koch International, Mark, Naxos, and Reference.

Artist Bios

John Lowry has been Associate Concertmaster of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra since 1987 and has also served as guest concertmaster of orchestras in Edmonton, Halifax, Winnipeg, Kitchener-Waterloo, and Red Deer, as well as the Adelaide Symphony of South Australia. He was formerly Concertmaster of the New Hampshire Philharmonic, Opera New England, and Yale Philharmonia, and has performed extensively with the Toronto Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Boston Pops, Canadian Opera Company, Opera Company of Boston, Amadeus Ensemble, National Ballet, Esprit, and New Haven Symphony.

Lowry was the founder and first artistic director of the Kensington Sinfonia in Calgary, and has appeared as soloist with orchestras in Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Halifax, and Red Deer, with such conductors as Hans Graf, Mario Bernardi, James Judd, Jean-François Rivest, Timothy Vernon, Ivars Taurins, Pierre Hétu, and Claude Lapalme.

A native of Edmonton, Lowry began his studies with Ranald Shean, going on to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in music from the University of Toronto and a master’s in music from Yale University. His principal teachers included George Neikrug, David Zafer, and Oscar Shumsky. He also participated in master classes and received extensive coaching from Steven Staryk, Orford Quartet, Tokyo Quartet, Rafael Hillyer, Joseph Silverstein, Szymon Goldberg, Lorand Fenyves, Sidney Harth, Zoltan Székely, Gábor Magyar, Anthony Newman, Jose Luis Garcia, Henri Temianka, and Shmuel Ashkenazi.

Lowry is a founding member of Calgary’s Land’s End Ensemble, which specializes in 20th and 21st century music, and its recordings have won the Western Canadian Music Award for Outstanding Classical Recording in 2005 and 2006, as well as the Juno Award for Classical Composition of the Year in 2014. The ensemble has performed at important festivals throughout Canada, most recently at the International Society for Contemporary Music World Music Days in Vancouver, and has premiered works by many landmark Canadian composers, including R. Murray Schafer, Alexina Louie, Allan Gordon Bell, Vincent Ho, and Omar Daniel.

As a chamber musician, Lowry has collaborated with such luminaries as James Campbell, Evelyn Glennie, Barry Shiffman, Robert Aitken, Jeff Nelson, Joel Sachs, Bernadene Blaha, Rivka Golani, Kevin Fitz-Gerald, Eliot Fisk, Robert Silverman, Angela Cheng, and Miriam Fried, and has performed with Aventa Ensemble, the Athabasca String Quartet, Rosa Selvatica, Trio Haydn de Montréal, and Yale Contemporary Ensemble.

Lowry is an instructor at MRU Conservatory, and was previously on the faculty of the University of Manitoba and University of Lowell, Massachusetts, and has also taught at the University of Calgary, as well as through summer programs at the Banff Centre, Comox Valley Youth Music Centre, Langley Community Music School, SUNY Potsdam, JVL Summer School for the Performing Arts, and Spencer Brook String Program in Concord, Massachusetts. He is an expert in the Dounis violin method and a frequent audition coach. Several recipients of his coaching have won positions in professional orchestras, and his students have earned top prizes in local and national festivals and competitions.

Lowry’s violins were made by Christopher Sandvoss in 2015, and Carlo Ferdinando Landolfi in 1769.

Olga Kotova, ViolinOlga Kotova has been a violinist of the First Violin Section with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra since 1996. Originally from Russia, she is an Honours Diploma graduate of the prestigious Moscow Central Music School and the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory. She has been performing as a soloist with Russian Orchestras since the age of 14, and became a semi-finalist of the Belgrad International Music Competition in Yugoslavia and the Louis Spohr International Competition in Freiburg, Germany.  Kotova is also a graduate of the University of Calgary’s masters program in violin performance and the Banff Centre music performance programs.

Kotova has mantained an active performing schedule as a violinist of Duo Solista, together with her husband and Honens Competition Laureate pianist Dmitry Nesterov. She has also been a member of numerous chamber ensembles and has been featured as a soloist with the Calgary Philharmonic on several occasions.

Hyewon Grillet-Kim received a bachelor’s degree from the San Francisco Conservatory of music, a master’s degree from the University of Minnesota, and a performer diploma and a doctorate in violin performance with a minor in early music history from the Jacobs School of Music of Indiana University. Her most influential teachers and mentors include Heilwig von Königslöw, Mark Sokol and Jorja Fleezanis.

A native Calgarian, Theresa Lane began playing violin at the age of four. She joined the second violin section of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra in 2012, while studying for her bachelor of music degree. After she graduated in 2014, with distinction, she went on to earn her master of music in violin performance in 2017. Both degrees were from the University of Calgary under the supervision of Professor Edmond Agopian. Lane has also had the privilege to be under the outstanding tutelage of retired CPO musicians Kathy Grigoriu, Alla Magid, and Čeněk Vrba.

During her studies, Lane was thrilled to be a winner of the 2011 University of Calgary Concerto Competition, performing the third movement of Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto on stage with the Calgary Phil.  Lane was also honoured to have been awarded many scholarships, including a Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship, The Marley Rynd Memorial Performance Scholarship, two Norman J. Kennedy Memorial Scholarships for String Instruments, and the Calgary Pro Musica Chamber Music Prize. Her master’s research centred on Roma (gypsy) and klezmer techniques in classical violin music, and was supported by a generous SSHRC grant. She travelled to Hungary and Romania to hear Roma musicians and eat far too much delicious food. Meanwhile, she furthered her study of non-western music styles in a Turkish-Canadian research-based music ensemble. During the summers, Lane has studied at international music programs including the Kuhmo Chamber Music Courses in Finland, the Orford Arts Centre, the Banff Centre, and the Saarburg International Music Festival and School in Germany.

More recently, Lane has focused on creating and presenting musical education programs. She is a founding member of the Bow Trio ensemble, which has received multiple grants from the National Arts Centre to develop workshops for children in schools across Calgary.

In her spare time, she loves dancing Argentine tango and West coast swing, learning circus aerials, and eating cheesecake.

Peter Blake joined the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra viola section in the fall of 2011. Prior to that he completed a masters of music and graduate diploma in viola performance at McGill University in Montreal. His undergraduate studies in violin performance were done at the University of Victoria. In the past he has enjoyed teaching, playing in various chamber ensembles, and participating in summer festival orchestras in Europe. His current passion is working on his 1984 Volvo 240 to make it look like it’s from the ’70s, but run like it’s from the ’90s.

In 1984 Arthur Bachmann graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a bachelor of music in viola performance. In 1986 he won a job as a violist in the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra — a position he holds to this day.

In 1990, Bachmann began a new career as a composer and arranger, and then became an Associate Composer of the Canadian Music Centre in 1997. His music has been heard on CBC Radio, recorded and performed across Canada, the United States and Europe. In September 2012, Bachmann premiered a new chamber opera, What Brought Us Here, commissioned and presented by Calgary Opera, and in September 2015, he premiered another chamber opera, Annie Davidson, commissioned and presented by Cowtown Opera, Calgary. The year 2016 brought forth a large scale flute concerto commissioned and presented by the Calgary Philharmonic with Principle Flautist Sara Hahn as soloist.

Bachmann’s compositions reflect his long-standing association and deep connection to the Alberta landscapes surrounding Calgary. A strong element of his music is melody as well as the incorporation of a sense of tonality. He makes use of all styles and forms of contemporary classical idioms to create his music and to bridge the gap between composer, performer and audience.

David Morrissey is a California native from Los Angeles. In 2008, he won the International Audition for the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra. He began playing the cello at the age of eight, and while in high school, started taking lessons with Ronald Leonard at the University of Southern California while enrolled in two high schools, Long Beach Polytechnic and The Orange County High School for the Arts. He received his bachelor’s degree from Indiana University, Bloomington, where he studied with Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi and Janos Starker, and his master’s degree in cello from Manhattan School of Music as a student of former Associate Principal Cellist of the New York Philharmonic, Alan Stepansky.

Morrissey continued his orchestral studies in Miami Beach, Florida, with the New World Symphony, an Orchestral Academy, under the musical direction of Michael Tilson Thomas. In 2001, the Leipziger Volkszeitung called him “a cellist with a bright future,” and his performance of the David Ott Double Cello Concerto with the Evansville Philharmonic in 2003 was praised by the Evansville Courier Press as “exemplifying the purest sound and musical taste.” His performances have taken him all over the U.S., as well as Rome, Montepulciano, Leipzig, Berlin, and Tokyo, just to name a few, and he is one of the founding members of the Young Janacek String Quartet. In 2017 he started instructing young cellists at the Phil Kids after school program. He also teaches his own students in his cello studio, and is a cello instructor at the Mount Royal Music Academy.

In his spare time Morrissey enjoys swimming and yoga-ing and he is an avid outdoor enthusiast with a passion for exploration. He spends his summers performing with the Colorado Music Festival in Boulder, Colorado, and climbing 14ers (mountains that exceed the 14,000 ft mark).

Daniel Poceta started playing cello at age five in his hometown of San Diego. He received his master’s degree from Rice University under the tutelage of Desmond Hoebig, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan, where he studied with Anthony Elliott. While at UM, he performed the Walton Cello Concerto with the UM Symphony Orchestra as a concerto competition winner, and also gave the world premiere of composer Michael Fumai’s Desiderata for cello and orchestra, under the baton of Elim Chan.

Festival appearances include three summers spent at the Tanglewood Music Center, where he performed under acclaimed conductors Andris Nelsons, Herbert Bloemstedt, Christoph von Dohnányi, and Stéphane Denève, among others. He has also spent summers at the Music Academy of the West and the Colorado College Summer Music Festival.

Poceta joins the Calgary Philharmonic from the Orchestra Now, an innovative orchestral training program affiliated with Bard College. Outside of music, he is passionate about baking bread and being outside as much as possible.

Karen YoungquistBorn in Peru and raised in Oregon, cellist Karen Youngquist began playing the cello at age 10 through her school’s music program. After earning a bachelor in music from the University of Oregon and a masters in music from the University of Michigan, she joined the Calgary Philharmonic in 1976.

In addition to her long tenure with the Orchestra, Youngquist has taught cello, chamber music, and orchestral ensemble to students of the Mount Royal College Conservatory and the Suzuki Talent Education Society.  She has performed with various summer music festivals, including the Canary Island Opera Festival, the Banff Festival of Arts, the Oregon Coast and Bach Music festivals in Oregon, and, in addition to a wide range of freelance work over the years in Alberta, has enjoyed a long association with Calgary’s Allegra String Quartet, providing musical backdrops to formal and social events of all kinds.

A native of Tacoma, Washington, double bassist Matthew Heller joined the Calgary Philharmonic in 2007. He has appeared frequently as a recitalist and chamber musician, including performances with the Mountain View Chamber Music Festival, Land’s End Chamber Ensemble, Kensington Sinfonia, and Instrumental Society of Calgary. He was awarded the Instrumental Society’s inaugural Janice Waite Scholarship in recognition of his contributions to Calgary’s performing arts community.

Heller also performs as Principal Bass with the Colorado Music Festival Orchestra, a summer orchestra in Boulder, Colorado. He was previously a member of the New World Symphony (Miami, Florida), Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, and Civic Orchestra of Chicago. He has been an orchestral fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center and the Verbier Festival in Switzerland, and performed chamber music with the St. Lawrence String Quartet at Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, South Carolina.

Heller completed studies at the New England Conservatory and at Northwestern University. He has studied with some of today’s most accomplished bassists, including Donald Palma, Harold Robinson, Michael Hovnanian, Matthew McDonald, and Joel Quarrington. Heller performs on an Italian double bass attributed to Antonio Gilbertini, dated 1862.

Slavko Popovic HeadshotSlavko Popovic joined the Calgary Philharmonic as their Principal Clarinetist in June 2018 at the age of 22.

Popovic is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music. While at Curtis, he had participated on two tours – a woodwind quintet tour of the United States and South America, and an orchestra tour of Europe. At Curtis he studied with Donald Montanaro, Ricardo Morales, Michael Rusinek, and Anthony McGill. He has performed with Michael Rusinek, Daniel Matuskawa (Bassoon), Jennifer Montone (Horn), Peter Serkin, Jennifer Koh, and Roberto Diaz, to name a few. Prior to entering Curtis, Popovic studied with Joseph Orlowski, Stephen Pierre, and Ross Edwards – with additional study with Kimball Sykes and Joaquin Valdepeñas.

He has performed as an extra clarinetist with the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, Princeton Symphony, Harrisburg Symphony, and Orchestra 2001. He has toured with both the National Youth Orchestra of Canada, and the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra – the latter of which he was featured as soloist in Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No 1. Popovic has also performed as soloist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra playing Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto, Oakville Symphony, Symphony Hamilton, and the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.

Popovic has attended music festivals such as the AIMS festival in Graz, Austria, National Orchestra Institute, International Music Academy in Mezzano, Italy, Manchester Music Festival, and for last four years has been part of the Lake George Festival in Lake George, NY. His Lake George performance of the Brahms Clarinet Trio was broadcast on “Performance Today” with Fred Child as the host. His various other chamber music performances have been broadcast on “WHYY” in Philadelphia.

When he isn’t practicing or performing, Popovic enjoys spending time with friends and family, and keeping fit by going on long bike rides, and swimming.

Michael Hope joined the bassoon section of Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra in 1982, and is one of Calgary’s most respected artists through his musicianship and his dedication to the life of our musical community. In addition to playing the bassoon, he has a remarkable second career as a highly praised vocalist. Hope first sang a symphonic pops show with the Calgary Phil in 1990. Since then, he has appeared as a popular soloist with nearly every Canadian orchestra. As a singer, he first gained recognition as the winner of the 1984 Calgary Kiwanis Music Festival Rose Bowl, and First Prize Winner in the 1988 CMC International Stepping Stones Competition. A prolific recording artist, he has made a number of critically acclaimed albums, and his latest CD of Classic inspirational songs, Hallelujah, won a Covenant Award Nomination for “Inspirational Album of the Year.”

Born in Toronto, Hope is a graduate of the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where he studied bassoon with Bernard Garfield and Sol Schoenbach.

Hope plays on a  5000 Series Heckel Bassoon that has recently been completely restored by the great Frank Marcus. In 2020 his marvellous instrument celebrated its 100th birthday. In addition to making music, he is obsessed with NHL hockey. He also enjoys repairing his old Toyota Camry and watching Grey’s Anatomy on Thursday nights with his Mom! Learn more about Michael by visiting his website at www.michaelhope.net.

Jennifer Frank-UmanaAssociate Principal horn Jennifer Frank-Umana joined the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra in 2007. Before coming to the Calgary Phil, she was a member of the Portland Symphony Orchestra, and an active freelance musician in the Greater Boston and New England Area, where she was also finishing her graduate studies. She has performed with the Dallas Symphony, Fort Worth Symphony, Portland Symphony, and the Rhode Island Philharmonic, and has participated in several music festivals, including the National Repertory Orchestra, and the National Orchestral Institute.

Frank-Umana grew up in Dallas, Texas, and began playing the horn when she was 12. Frank-Umana received her bachelor of music degree from Southern Methodist University and her master of music degree from the New England Conservatory. Her principal teachers include Gregory Hustis, former Principal horn of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, and James Sommerville, Principal horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Other influential teachers include William VerMeulen, Richard Sebring, Julie Landsman, Michelle Baker, and Jennifer Montone.

She is a mom to two wonderful boys and enjoys getting outside, walking her dog Wrigley, and spending time with her family.

Virtual Concert FAQ

Our virtual concerts are free to watch, but first you have to register at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts.

You can view the concert on any device, including smartphone, tablet, laptop, desktop computer, or a television connected to the internet. Ensure your device is fully charged, powered on or plugged-in, and double check your sound is on.

Just before the performance begins, and using your selected viewing device:

  1. Open the PDF e-tickets attached to your email.
  2. Click the link on your PDF, or enter the URL in the search/address bar or of your internet browser. The concert viewing page will open.
  3. Copy or type your Unique Access Code (the code is case sensitive) into the password box and press play.
  4. Each performance will start at 7:30PM on the date of the premiere. Enjoy the music!

The video will be available starting at 7:30PM on the day of the concert premiere, and then will remain available for 30 days. If your video doesn’t start right at 7:30PM, you may need to refresh your web browser or click the link again — don’t worry, the concert will start from the beginning when you hit play, so even if you’re late, you won’t miss anything.

For the optimal listening experience, we recommend listening through high-quality headphones or stream through your home stereo. Our video was captured in High Definition (1080p) and will look great on any screen you choose — to watch the concert in full-screen mode, click the four arrows in the bottom right-hand corner of the video to maximize your screen.

Here are some articles we think you might find helpful for setup:

These concerts are about 60 minutes, although each performance will be different.

Don’t worry! The video will be available for 30 days starting at 7:30PM on the day of the concert premiere. You can watch the performance as many times as you’d like using your concert link and access code. After 30 days, the video will no longer be available.

Yes, you can register at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts anytime within 30 days of the concert premiere.

It’s easy! You can register online at calgaryphil.com/virtual-concerts. First, choose the concert you want to watch and follow the prompts. You can continue to select other upcoming concerts, one at a time, by clicking the titles in the basket. Then click the Checkout button and enter your email.

If you have an account with us, you’ll be asked for your password (if you can’t remember it, just click Forgotten Password? and we’ll email you a link to reset it). If you don’t have an existing account, you can provide your name and a password to create one.

At this stage, you can choose to set a password, or continue without setting a password. Once you’ve confirmed your order, check your email. You should receive an order confirmation followed by an email with your e-tickets attached as a PDF. Your e-ticket has the link and the Unique Access Code you’ll need to watch the concert.

If you have any problems registering, please contact us at info@calgaryphil.com and we’re happy to help. We’re also available by phone on weekdays from 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM at 403.571.0849.

If you’re watching together on one device, you only need to register one person.

Yes, if you prefer to register by phone, you can call our Box Office at 403.571.0849 (Monday to Friday 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM) and our sales team will be happy to help you. You’ll need to provide an email address so they can send you an e-ticket, which will include the link for the concert and the Unique Access Code you need to watch it.

You do need to register for each concert you want to watch because every concert will have its own concert link and Unique Access Code.

Yes, absolutely! You can register for as many virtual concerts as you want. During the registration process, once you’ve selected the number of tickets you want for an individual concert, a list of the other available concerts will be visible — simply click the title of the next concert you want to watch, then repeat the process until they’re all in your basket. You will receive a separate e-ticket with a different link and Unique Access Code for each concert. Keep in mind that the performances will be available for 30 days starting at the listed date and time of the premiere.

Check your email junk and/or spam folder. If it’s not there, login to your account at calgaryphil.com/account. Under Details, click the e-tickets link and from there you can download the ticket for the concert link and Unique Access Code.

If you’re still having problems, contact us at info@calgaryphil.com and we’re happy to help. We’re also available by phone on weekdays from 9AM to 5PM and concert days from 6PM to 8PM at 403.571.0849.

These concerts are part of our new fall series running from October to December 2020 and were specifically created to provide an online viewing experience during this period when we aren’t able to have a live audience in our concert hall. The performances will premiere online, and then they will be available to view on our website for 30 days. The concerts on our All Access page are from our archive of live-stream recordings in previous seasons.

For the health and safety of our musicians, staff, and the public, we are carefully following the COVID-19 guidelines set out by Alberta Health Services. At this time indoor gatherings of more than 50 people are not allowed, and provincial and municipal protocols require everyone to physically distance and wear masks. We have 66 full-time musicians in our Orchestra, and live concerts also involve several people behind the scenes to monitor the sound, move equipment, assist the artists, etc. As a result, it is not feasible to invite a live audience into the concert hall at this time.

Although you only see our musicians onscreen during the performance, we also have a small production crew and a few camera operators who help make sure the concert and the video recording process runs smoothly. Everybody wears masks to help protect each other and to comply with city bylaws. In concerts involving wind and brass instruments, some musicians will remove their masks when it’s time to play. When a musician has a medical mask exemption, extra precautions are taken to protect the other musicians and crew involved in the performance.